GRNSW call for feedback on rule to reduce unnecessary euthanasia

Greyhound Racing NSW (GRNSW) has sent out a call to participants for input on a proposed local rule which aims to reduce the euthanasia rates of healthy greyhounds and seek to promote responsible ownership within the industry.

The proposal is a part of GRNSW’s renewed efforts to ensure animal welfare is at the forefront of the sport, with the rule making it mandatory for all registered owners to ensure all possible avenues are explored to rehome their greyhounds once they have retired from racing.

Healthy greyhounds will only be able to be euthanised by a qualified veterinary surgeon and when the owner has demonstrated they have made reasonable efforts to first rehome the greyhound.

Owners will also only be allowed to surrender a greyhound to the local council after they have demonstrated that they have made reasonable efforts to rehome the greyhound.

Under the proposed local rule, a greyhound will only be deemed unable or unsuitable to be rehomed if:

    – The owner of the greyhound can explain why they cannot retain the greyhound the greyhound as a pet; and
    – The owner has contacted the GRNSW Greyhounds As Pets adoption program and at least two other rehoming providers which have all declined to accept the greyhound for rehoming purposes; or
    – a veterinary surgeon or rehoming provider has assessed the greyhound as not being suitable for rehoming

Additionally, GRNSW is also proposing to make the non-veterinary euthanasia of greyhounds in emergency situations permissible only when it is clearly essential to sudden and catastrophic injury and emergency veterinary attention is not available within a reasonable period of time.

In case of emergency, the industry participant will be required to contact a veterinary surgeon and gain approval for the euthanasia and the method of euthanasia.

After this, the participant will then be required to report the details of the euthanasia to GRNSW within a 24 hour period, with the deceased greyhound to be taken to a veterinary clinic where it must be made available for a post-morton examination if required by GRNSW.

Once authorised by GRNSW, the deceased greyhound must be disposed of by the veterinary clinic.

Industry participants are invited to complete Participant Feedback Forms so that GRNSW can receive as much industry input as possible in regards to the proposed local rule.

Forms must be revived by GRNSW by close of business on Friday May, 13, 2016, and can be submitted as follows:

– Email: [email protected]
– Fax: (02) 9674 6244
– Post: Greyhound Racing NSW, Building B, 1 Homebush Bay Drive, Rhodes NSW 2138

GRNSW has requested that all emails, faxes and envelopes refer to”Local Rule Feedback’.

Past Discussion

  1. This ‘local rule’  will kill the industry if its introduced fullstop.  If they bring it in, then do the same to the thoroughbreds and the trots.

  2. This ‘local rule’  will kill the industry if its introduced fullstop.  If they bring it in, then do the same to the thoroughbreds and the trots.

  3. Has the veterinary profession signed off on these proposed rules? Are veterinarians OK with having to approve sometimes makeshift methods of euthanasia over the telephone for catastrophically injured dogs that are in agony?  Are there no ethical problems raised by the “euthanasia” of healthy animals?  Is there no conflict of interest involved when a vet is asked to certify a certain dog as unsuitable to be rehomed, knowing that she can then earn a nice fee for euthanizing it? Are all vet clinics prepared to receive the carcasses of greyhounds euthanized by their owners, and store them until GRNSW either orders a post-mortem examination or authorizes the disposal of the carcass, as required by this rule?
    Is GRNSW going to do anything about the culling-by-killing of some 2,000 unnamed greyhound pups per year in NSW? They won’t be covered by this proposed local rule.

  4. Has the veterinary profession signed off on these proposed rules? Are veterinarians OK with having to approve sometimes makeshift methods of euthanasia over the telephone for catastrophically injured dogs that are in agony?  Are there no ethical problems raised by the “euthanasia” of healthy animals?  Is there no conflict of interest involved when a vet is asked to certify a certain dog as unsuitable to be rehomed, knowing that she can then earn a nice fee for euthanizing it? Are all vet clinics prepared to receive the carcasses of greyhounds euthanized by their owners, and store them until GRNSW either orders a post-mortem examination or authorizes the disposal of the carcass, as required by this rule?

    Is GRNSW going to do anything about the culling-by-killing of some 2,000 unnamed greyhound pups per year in NSW? They won’t be covered by this proposed local rule.  

  5. Did GRNSW not read the report it commissioned itself regarding ‘industry stakeholders’?  This needs to be a public consultation not just ‘industry participants’ who we already know are out of step with what the public deems acceptable.  If you want to retain your ‘social licence’ you need to operate in a manner that is acceptable to the public.  So ask them what is acceptable.  And if the industry can’t operate in a manner that is acceptable it needs to be phased out.

  6. Did GRNSW not read the report it commissioned itself regarding ‘industry stakeholders’?  This needs to be a public consultation not just ‘industry participants’ who we already know are out of step with what the public deems acceptable.  If you want to retain your ‘social licence’ you need to operate in a manner that is acceptable to the public.  So ask them what is acceptable.  And if the industry can’t operate in a manner that is acceptable it needs to be phased out.

  7. Stripey Joe Stripey, you are NOT a stakeholder!.  Your ‘social licence’ is nothing more than a form of bullying.  Get off this website.

  8. Stripey Joe Stripey, you are NOT a stakeholder!.  Your ‘social licence’ is nothing more than a form of bullying.  Get off this website.

  9. The local rule is a default position which will in the eyes of the control board justify their position in animal welfare to the public but while it may have a small positive effect on avoiding cruelty to animals it will be come an administrative nightmare and hardly value for the substantial spend it will cause. The trauma caused by recent events in greyhound racing deserves to cause creative tensions and creative solutions not a return to middle ages regulations and a failure to administer them. The society at large demands reforms in animal rights but is not willing to progress then in Australia. The normalisation of animals does not include their rights to travel on public transport or the right of housing in various situations . The human population ages and households with animals have to move into body corporates who have rules excluding animals. The above situations puts companion animals in danger of euthanasia and this group involves high numbers. The question of the numbers of euthanasia in the companion animal world cannot be segmented into one particular breed. While the percentage of greyhounds euthanised appears high it is small in actual numbers in comparison to other breeds. Obviously if greyhounds were the only canines put up for adoption then the demand for adopted dogs would far exceed the supply. The alternative view would be that every greyhound that was put up and adopted by the public means that another dog breed at present would miss adoption. The greyhounds cannot win the war passing on its problems to others so there must be creative solutions. The greyhound authorities should support the normalisation of canines generally by supporting reforms in the socialisation of canines generally and encouraging the melding of greyhounds and the public on racetracks. The greyhound day last Sunday at Cessnock in the trendy Hunter which attracted three times to crowds on a wet day than similar events to the south was a good start. A spend in this and similar  areas out of the welfare vote would be more productive than the spend on regulation. It is not up to me or anyone else to assume what the public interest on cultural matters is but attitudes in the English speaking world seem to be weary of continual spin of people in control.

  10. The local rule is a default position which will in the eyes of the control board justify their position in animal welfare to the public but while it may have a small positive effect on avoiding cruelty to animals it will be come an administrative nightmare and hardly value for the substantial spend it will cause. The trauma caused by recent events in greyhound racing deserves to cause creative tensions and creative solutions not a return to middle ages regulations and a failure to administer them. The society at large demands reforms in animal rights but is not willing to progress then in Australia. The normalisation of animals does not include their rights to travel on public transport or the right of housing in various situations . The human population ages and households with animals have to move into body corporates who have rules excluding animals. The above situations puts companion animals in danger of euthanasia and this group involves high numbers. The question of the numbers of euthanasia in the companion animal world cannot be segmented into one particular breed. While the percentage of greyhounds euthanised appears high it is small in actual numbers in comparison to other breeds. Obviously if greyhounds were the only canines put up for adoption then the demand for adopted dogs would far exceed the supply. The alternative view would be that every greyhound that was put up and adopted by the public means that another dog breed at present would miss adoption. The greyhounds cannot win the war passing on its problems to others so there must be creative solutions. The greyhound authorities should support the normalisation of canines generally by supporting reforms in the socialisation of canines generally and encouraging the melding of greyhounds and the public on racetracks. The greyhound day last Sunday at Cessnock in the trendy Hunter which attracted three times to crowds on a wet day than similar events to the south was a good start. A spend in this and similar  areas out of the welfare vote would be more productive than the spend on regulation. It is not up to me or anyone else to assume what the public interest on cultural matters is but attitudes in the English speaking world seem to be weary of continual spin of people in control.