Report Gives Greyhounds Queensland The Logan Green Light

Concerns about gas leakage from the landfill site of the proposed Greyhounds Queensland Cronulla Park greyhound race track have been quashed by the latest environmental report from the site.

Greyhounds Queensland Ltd (GQL) met last week with engineers from Sinclair Knight Merz (SKM), a leading engineering, sciences and project delivery firm that work closely with the Queensland Government; to review the preliminary report on the site and GQL chair Kerry Watson was excited by the study’s findings. “We could not have been happier with the report and it now opens the way up for us to further investigate building a stand alone greyhound complex on the site,” Ms Watson said.

According to Greyhounds Queensland the SKM environmental study on Cronulla Park at Logan has paved the way for plans to make the site into an stand alone and industry owned greyhound racing facility, butthere is further work to be done to “cap” areas of the land fill site that re too close to the surface.

Cronulla Park was used from 1970s to 1980s as a landfill site. An investigation in 1995 reported no heavy industrial, hazardous, medical or liquid wastes were accepted at the site. SKM investigated three key elements at Cronulla Park, the capping materials, groundwater and landfill gases.

SKM found that the capping material varied in thickness from approximately 0.8 metres to 0.2 metres. SKM has recommended that in areas where the capping layer was found to be thin, the capping layer will need to be increased to approximately 0.5m in thickness.

The estimated cost of the additional capping material is in the region of $50,000 and the additional capping will also require further soli be brought on to the site area to level up the site again. The costings of this will be further revealed when Greyhounds Queensland make public the findings of a yet to be concluded engineering feasibility study.

SKM said that the landfill at Cronulla Park is unlikely to pose an unacceptable health and environmental risk for users of the site, subject to appropriate controls considered common to developing on former landfill sites. That leave Greyhounds Queensland to now organise talks between the engineers and architects taking into consideration the environmental study’s findings and to consider the engineering feasibility study.

Once costings and plans can be drawn, these will then be presented to Logan City Council for planning approval and application.

Ms Watson said GQL would keep Minister responsible for Racing Peter Lawlor informed of the progress. “We are happy SKM has given us such a good report on Cronulla Park,” she said. “There are a number of factors which will need to be monitored in the future. GQL and the Logan City Council will partner this monitoring.”

“But the greyhound industry can rest assured these findings clear the way for the next step towards the building of the first stand alone greyhound complex in Queensland.”

A representative of the Logan City Council also attended the meeting with SKM to hear the report on the findings after several months testing at Cronulla Park.